The Joseph Project is a faith-based program in partnership with Senator Ron Johnson’s office that connects people to employment. Participants go through a four-day life skills training program and then are offered a chance to interview with companies looking to hire at a living wage.

“One thing the Joseph Project is doing is break boundaries helping anyone who wants to help themselves succeed. It’s a great opportunity to get ahead in life and exceed your potential. These aren’t just jobs, these are careers, a start to a better life.” -Daniel, project participant

The Joseph Project started as a constituent service through the office of U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson in collaboration with Greater Praise Church of God in Christ in Downtown Milwaukee. Johnson staffers worked with Pastor Jerome Smith of Greater Praise Church of God in Christ to identify people ready for a life change, based on their attitude and determination.

“Workforce remains a challenge for manufacturers in Wisconsin.  Through The Joseph Project we continue to identify candidates who desire full time employment.  In every community across the state we need to connect those genuinely seeking opportunities with the opportunities that already exist.  Our partnership with The Micah Center has allowed us to do that in Green Bay.”
– U.S. Senator Ron Johnson

Because of its initial success, The Joseph Project is rapidly expanding and providing connections throughout the state for individuals who have a desire to work with businesses willing to pay a living wage. The Micah Center is the home of The Joseph Project in the Green Bay area.

“I found Joseph Project classes to be very informative in preparing for employment and all other aspects of life. It was fantastic.” -Martin, project participant

The Joseph Project promotes life skills such as team work, time management, financial management, spiritual fitness, stress management and conflict resolution to name a few. Program advocates work with participants to develop interview skills as well as assist in the writing of resumes.

“The Joseph Project instills confidence in those who may have been rejected before,” says Dan Wolff project coordinator. “We have close to a dozen business partners for employment and assisting with the mock interviews,” and Dan says, “We are hoping to see that grow.”

Eugene Smalls is the other project coordinator at the Micah Center, and he shares Dan’s hope for the future and for those who become part of The Joseph Project.  “I really hope that people rebuild their professional values, create meaningful relationships and develop a great work ethic,” Eugene says. The Green Bay project at the Micah Center is still learning what works best in our community and modifying the program as it progresses. Eugene and Dan hope that more community members reach out to get help through The Joseph Project, whether they are currently part of a St. John’s program or not. Dan says, “We are always looking for people to be referred to the project. Perhaps people are unemployed or they are underemployed and just surviving. We want to help get them connected to something better.”

More on The Joseph Project: https://www.stjohnhomelessshelter.org/about/our-organizations/the-micah-center.